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Police logs reveal that ex-Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh was hospitalized shortly before his death – Daily Mail

Police logs have revealed that worried friends called 911 on multiple occasions expressing concern for the safety of ex-Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh in the months before his death from a house fire.

Records of calls to emergency services acquired by Business Insider also showed that Hsieh was transported to hospital in late June, where an anonymous friend asked that he not be released as it would ‘be a problem’.

Hsieh, 46, had allegedly been hospitalized after smashing up his Park City, Utah, mansion and threatening to hurt himself.

Several weeks later, a friend made another call to the police to report that Hsieh was ‘very paranoid’ and again voiced concerns over his safety.

Hsieh had relocated to Park City early in the summer, hosting parties and bonfires and snapping up eight multi-million-dollar homes and a private club before he died late last month. 

Worried friends allegedly called 911 on multiple occasions telling cops that ex-Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh, pictured, had threatened to hurt himself in the months before his death

Worried friends allegedly called 911 on multiple occasions telling cops that ex-Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh, pictured, had threatened to hurt himself in the months before his death

Worried friends allegedly called 911 on multiple occasions telling cops that ex-Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh, pictured, had threatened to hurt himself in the months before his death

Emergency services visited his Utah estate, pictured, on two occasions over the summer after 911 calls from friends. He was hospitalized after the June call although it is not known why

Emergency services visited his Utah estate, pictured, on two occasions over the summer after 911 calls from friends. He was hospitalized after the June call although it is not known why

Emergency services visited his Utah estate, pictured, on two occasions over the summer after 911 calls from friends. He was hospitalized after the June call although it is not known why

He spent at least $50 million as part of his plan to relocate to the millionaires’ playground. 

Hsieh died on November 27 following a suspicious fire nine days earlier in his girlfriend Rachael Brown’s home in New London, Connecticut.

He had allegedly become more fascinated with fire and inhaled increasing amounts of nitrous oxide in the lead up to his death. 

According to the recently released police call logs, on at least two occasions over the summer, emergency services were called to check on the former CEO, Business Insider reports.

Records from the Summit County Sheriff’s Office revealed that on June 10, an anonymous male friend called 911 to report that Hsieh had smashed up his mansion and had threatened to hurt himself.

Emergency services succeeded in contacting Hsieh after the call and he was hospitalized. It is unclear where he was taken for treatment.

That evening, another call to dispatch expressed concern that Hsieh would be released again.

‘If he gets released it will be a problem,’ they said, adding that they wanted to ‘make sure the hospital staff understand the situation fully.’

Former Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh, 46, died of smoke inhalation as a result of a Connecticut house fire in November

Former Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh, 46, died of smoke inhalation as a result of a Connecticut house fire in November

Former Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh, 46, died of smoke inhalation as a result of a Connecticut house fire in November

On August 14, another call was made by an anonymous male friend expressing concern that Hsieh was ‘very paranoid’.

They claimed that staff had taken Hsieh’s phone and that they had last communicated with him in July, when the businessman had said he was going on a digital detox.

According to Business Insider, on this call, the friend made a reference to Hsieh’s use of nitrous oxide.

The dispatcher contacted one of Hsieh’s relatives after the call who said that everything was under control, but emergency services still carried out a check on the home.

On other occasions since Hsieh’s move to Utah, cops were called to his home over noise complaints, as neighbors fumed over construction work and loud music.

In June, deputies responded to a complaint that construction work was taking place during designated quiet hours but found that the crew had a permit to be working at that time.

On Labor Day, they also responded to ‘music blasting’ at 8.30pm from Hsieh’s main nine-bedroom mansion.

The fire department was also called to the home the following day after reports of a hot air balloon shooting flames.

Hsieh had allegedly developed a fascination with fire in the past few months, which played a role in his death.

On the night that he was injured, candle-loving Hsieh was locked in a shed outside his girlfriend’s Connecticut home at 3.30am when it caught fire. 

Details of the shed fire that killed him are still unclear however authorities say he died from smoke inhalation and that the blaze was accidental. 

Hsieh, 46, was pulled unconscious from a burning shed (pictured) attached to the waterfront home owned by his girlfriend in New London, Connecticut, shortly after 3.30am on November 18. He died in hospital nine days later from smoke inhalation, police say

Hsieh, 46, was pulled unconscious from a burning shed (pictured) attached to the waterfront home owned by his girlfriend in New London, Connecticut, shortly after 3.30am on November 18. He died in hospital nine days later from smoke inhalation, police say

Hsieh, 46, was pulled unconscious from a burning shed (pictured) attached to the waterfront home owned by his girlfriend in New London, Connecticut, shortly after 3.30am on November 18. He died in hospital nine days later from smoke inhalation, police say

It only took firefighters minutes to force their way in and drag Hsieh out, it was too late to save him. 'One victim being pulled from the fire now — unresponsive,' a firefighter says just eight and a half minutes into the call. The fire was reported as under control moments later

It only took firefighters minutes to force their way in and drag Hsieh out, it was too late to save him. 'One victim being pulled from the fire now — unresponsive,' a firefighter says just eight and a half minutes into the call. The fire was reported as under control moments later

It only took firefighters minutes to force their way in and drag Hsieh out, it was too late to save him. ‘One victim being pulled from the fire now — unresponsive,’ a firefighter says just eight and a half minutes into the call. The fire was reported as under control moments later

Hsieh suddenly stepped down from Zappos in August after continuing to lead it for a decade after he sold the online shoe-seller to Amazon for $214 million. His estimated wealth at the time of his death was $840 million.

After his move to Utah, friends had warned Hsieh that he was living dangerously and was known to be constantly abusing drugs and alcohol.

Hsieh had allegedly finally come to admit that his addictions had gotten out of control and had accepted he needed help.

Just before he died, he was making plans to enter a rehab clinic the very night before he died, The Wall Street Journal reported.

The multimillionaire had been experimenting with psychedelic mushrooms and ecstasy.

He had also reportedly become ‘fixated’ with what he could live without and would starve himself until he weighed under 100lbs.

He tried not to urinate and deprived himself of oxygen.

Friends say he had been in a ‘downward spiral’ for months and had surrounded himself with ‘yes’ men as he slowly increased his drug and alcohol intake.

Three months before he died, he received a letter from Jewel, a singer and longtime friend of Hsieh.

The letter, which was obtained by Forbes, warned that Hsieh was at risk of being remembered as drug addict and not the tech visionary he was.

She wrote that his current lifestyle choices were putting him in danger of crossing from ‘eccentric to madness’.

Hsieh had gone to Connecticut to be with friends and told them to check on him every five minutes when he was in the shed. It’s unclear why but he had brought a heater out there to lower the oxygen levels inside.

Despite apparently telling his friends to check on him, he had barricaded himself inside.

A 911 dispatch tape obtained by DailyMail.com revealed that he was still ‘barricaded’ inside the shed at the time of the fire.

‘The male is barricaded inside and not answering the door,’ the dispatcher says. ‘Everyone else is outside the house.

‘They are trying to get him to open up.’ 

Cops have still been called to Hsieh’s Utah home after his death.

Business Insider states that on Saturday, there was a break-in at one of the homes under constructions near his main mansion. It is unclear if anything was stolen.

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